Friday The 13th

April 14th, 2007 by Voxx

superstition.jpgBeing as today was Friday the 13th, I decided to do a Tarot Reading (using, as always — The Book of Thoth Tarot). I asked the Psychic reason for the phenomena known as Paraskevidkatriaphobia, in other words, Fear of Friday the 13th. The former syndrome is somewhat related to Triskadecaphobia, an irrational fear of the Number 13.

The Tarot Reading: The cards I pulled were 1) The Sun; 2) The Ace of Cups; and 3) The 3 of Swords; 4) The top card was 7 of Disks; and 5) The bottom card was the Queen of Wands.

Tarot Translation: The Sun card indicated that the fears are exaggerated and overblown; The Ace of Cups shows the linking of the Divine Feminine (Cups) with the fear of the 13 Lunar Months, representing the female fertility cycle; and the 3 of Swords again shows this fear creates its own misfortune by worry and the power of rumor. The 7 of Disks shows that the fear of this number (especially when it falls on a Friday), causes people to hesitate to start any new venture at this time. Funny, since 13 is the number of fertility! The Queen of Wands tends to back up my assumption, as the real fear of this card is linked to the Goddess and her power of creation.

I then asked if Paraskevidkatriaphobia was Christian in origin and received the 8 of Disks as an answer. This shows this information has been written about, and projected as fact. This answer showed the foundation of this irrational fear originated from these two situations: 1) The destruction of Constantinople; and 2) The martyrdom of Jacques DeMolay at the hands of King Phillipe of France.

I then asked if either Paraskevidkatriaphobia was Pagan in origin and received Fortune (The Wheel) as an answer. This showed there was no Pagan foundation to this belief — actually, quite the opposite!

My final question was if people should really worry about Friday the 13th, and the answer was: The Magus, in essence, no — people should not allow the fear of Friday the 13th to affect them in a negative way. The reading also intimates to me that those who actively fear the date Friday the 13th, tend to create their own misfortunes.

For more info on the origins of the idea of bad luck on Friday the 13th, and check out what Wikipedia has to say about the subject. Feel free to check out my Magickal Forum and post your own experiences with Metaphysics and Magick.

Posted in Astrology, Hexes, Occult Psychology, Tarot, Weird News | 3 Comments »


 

3 Responses

  1. Heather

    Ok… not to be a complete dork… but you read my mind. ;p

    All day I’ve been “asking” for a tribute, a WORTHY tribute. Friday the 13th is always my private (and at times NOT so private) holiday. There are many reasons and I won’t get into here (many relating to my b-day 11/13, obviously)…

    There is definitely an unfortunate and completely unnecessary fear in the air on these days. It’s rather bothersome.

    “…those who actively fear the date Friday the 13th, tend to create their own misfortunes.”

    I agree… 113% ;p

    Danke!

    93 93/93
    Heather

  2. Heather

    Just wanted to add that those NOT so private F13 days are when I decide to set the record straight with some folks…

    My favorite explanation from one of the links you provided (which, not surprisingly, I’ve read)…

    The Witch-Goddess

    The name “Friday” was derived from a Norse deity worshipped on the sixth day, known either as Frigg (goddess of marriage and fertility), or Freya (goddess of sex and fertility), or both, the two figures having become intertwined in the handing-down of myths over time (the etymology of “Friday” has been given both ways). Frigg/Freya corresponded to Venus, the goddess of love of the Romans, who named the sixth day of the week in her honor “dies Veneris.”

    Friday was actually considered quite lucky by pre-Christian Teutonic peoples, we are told — especially as a day to get married — because of its traditional association with love and fertility. All that changed when Christianity came along. The goddess of the sixth day — most likely Freya in this context, given that the cat was her sacred animal — was recast in post-pagan folklore as a witch, and her day became associated with evil doings.

    Various legends developed in that vein, but one is of particular interest: As the story goes, the witches of the north used to observe their sabbath by gathering in a cemetery in the dark of the moon. On one such occasion the Friday goddess, Freya herself, came down from her sanctuary in the mountaintops and appeared before the group, who numbered only 12 at the time, and gave them one of her cats, after which the witches’ coven — and, by tradition, every properly-formed coven since — comprised exactly 13.

  3. Voxx

    .’.93.’.

    Thanks for informative comment! I’m glad you enjoyed the post!

    LVX,
    Voxx

Leave a Comment

Please note: Comment moderation is enabled and may delay your comment. There is no need to resubmit your comment.

 

Consultations


Podcasts


Subscribe

     
  • with iTunes    (Available soon)

Syndication



My Book Club

  • Recommended Reading